Frequently Asked Questions

How do I care for my jewellery?
Are chains included for necklaces?
Are the stones real?
What is Vermeil?
What is Yellow Gold?
What is White Gold?
What is Rose Gold?
What is Sterling Silver?
Our Care Guide
How do I care for Sterling Silver items?
How do I care for Gold items?
How do I care for gemstones?
How do I measure my Ring size?

How do I care for my jewellery?

To protect your jewellery from damage it should be stored in a fabric lined jewellery box or in a polishing pouch in order to prevent scratches and tarnishing.

Are chains included for necklaces?

Yes, unless otherwise noted in the product detail all of our necklaces and pendants are delivered with the chain shown.

Are the stones real?

Yes. Where detailed, pieces on this site are made with real precious or semi-precious gemstones. Where they are significant, stone weights have been included in the product descriptions.

What is Vermeil?

Vermeil is a combination of Sterling Silver with a layer of gold on top. To be considered vermeil, the gold must be at least 10ct and be at least 1.5micrometres thick. Any other metal plated onto Sterling Silver cannot be called vermeil. Vermeil can be produced by fire gilding or electrolysis. Fire gilding is an antiquated process, however, and most vermeil these days is produced by way of electrolysis. Vermeil is a French word, now commonly used in the English language mostly in America. It became a popular term in the 19th century as an alternative to the term silver-gilt.

What is Yellow Gold?

Gold is graded by carats (ct). The carat system for Gold, unlike diamonds, is a method of expressing the proportion of gold to other metals in a particular alloy. Pure Gold is 24ct. 18ct gold contains 18 parts of gold to 6 parts of other metals and is thus 75% pure Gold. 18ct Gold jewellery is hallmarked ‘750’.

What is White Gold?

Gold is graded by carats (ct). The carat system for gold, unlike diamonds, is a measure of the purity of gold by weight. The carat measures the proportion of gold to other metals in a particular alloy. Pure gold is 24ct. 22ct gold contains 22 parts of gold to 2 parts of other metals, while 9ct gold contains 9 parts of gold to 15 parts of other metals.

White gold is achieved by combining pure gold with alloys such as silver and palladium. Traditionally, nickel was used in white gold; however, nickel is no longer used in most white gold today as nickel can cause allergic reactions in some wearers.

As the natural colour of white gold is a greyish colour, almost all white gold jewellery is plated with a metal called Rhodium, which is a member of the Palladium family of metals. Rhodium is used to brighten the colour of white gold. Rhodium is very white and very hard, but it does wear eventually, particularly on rings. It is a very common practice to have rings re-plated with Rhodium, and most local jewellers will offer this service.

What is Rose Gold?

Gold is graded by carats (ct). The carat system for gold, unlike diamonds, is a method of expressing the proportion of gold to other metals in a particular alloy. Pure gold is 24ct. 22ct gold contains 22 parts of gold to 2 parts of other metals, while 9ct gold contains 9 parts of gold to 15 parts of other metals.

Rose gold is the result of varying the proportions of copper and silver in the alloy, which results in a beautiful reddish hue.

What is Sterling Silver?

Sterling Silver is an alloy of silver and other metals, usually copper. Sterling silver is 925 parts per thousand Silver with the remaining 75 parts being other metals. As pure silver is generally too soft for manufacturing into larger objects and for everyday wear, copper is generally used to give it strength while at the same time preserving the ductility of the metal and its beauty.

Our Care Guide

Daily wear and pollutants all conspire to dull the surface of silver and gold or cloud the colour of semi-precious stones. We suggest that your jewellery receive periodic professional maintenance.

Most precious stone jewellery and silverware can be cleaned in warm water, using a mild detergent. Always dry your jewellery and silverware after cleaning with a soft cloth.

Since many genuine gemstones and especially pearls are quite delicate, hot water, harsh chemicals and cleaners should be avoided at all times. Very porous stones such as pearls, opals and emeralds should be cleaned using an untreated, dry, soft cloth ONLY. We do not recommend the use of any jewellery polishing cloths which have been treated with cleaners or polishing agents

How do I care for Sterling Silver items?

Sterling Silver can be polished up by rubbing or buffing it with a soft cotton cloth. If silver jewellery is stored in a plastic bag with an interlocking seal, it will be less likely to tarnish as it is no longer exposed to the air / environment.

Like gold, silver is susceptible to damage by chlorine. Avoid wearing silver jewellery when using chlorine or bleach, in a pool, on the beach or in a hot tub.

How do I care for Gold items?

Generally, the higher the carat weight of gold, the softer the metal (as gold is a soft metal). 9ct gold, being alloyed with other metals, tends to be more resistant to scratching 22ct gold.

Gold should be cleaned regularly to maintain its beauty. A soft, lint free cloth is an effective way to keep gold jewellery looking shiny and lustrous.

Gold is a relatively delicate material and particularly susceptible to damage from chlorine. Chlorine can permanently damage or discolour gold jewellery. For that reason, you should avoid wearing gold jewellery when using chlorine or bleach, or while in a pool or hot tub.

How do I care for gemstones?

Particular care should be taken with gemstones to ensure that they are not knocked when worn, and care should also be taken to ensure that they don’t knock against one another when stored.

Many gemstones are also susceptible to damage by chemicals, water and even sunlight.

Some stones can be quite porous (such as Opal, Pearl and Turquoise), which means you shouldn’t leave these kinds of stones immersed in water for too long.

As an organic gem material, pearls need to be especially well looked after. They are particularly susceptible to damage from chemicals such as perfume, make-up and hair spray. Apply all make-up and hair spray prior to putting on pearl jewellery. Wipe your pearls with a soft, lint-free cloth as soon as you take them off. The cloth can be dampened with water, or it can be dry. If damp, allow the pearls to air dry before putting them away. Pearls must never be put in an ultrasonic cleaning machine, or be cleaned with ammonia or harsh detergents.

How do I measure my Ring size?

Your finger size can change throughout the day so it’s best to measure at the end of the day when your fingers are at their largest. Do not measure when your hands are cold; your fingers will be at least half a size smaller. See our Ring Size Information.